Monthly Archives: February 2020

Planning Your Garden: Think Like a Pollinator

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Every food source and habitat provided can help pollinators rebound from the challenges they face. You can provide food and habitat in your garden to help pollinators thrive.

Here are seven ways to make your garden a haven for native pollinators:

  1. Use pollinator-friendly plants in your green spaces. Shrubs and trees such as dogwood, blueberry, cherry, plum, willow, and poplar provide pollen or nectar, or both, early in spring when food is scarce.
  2. Choose a mixture of plants for spring, summer, and autumn. Different flower colours, shapes, and scents will attract a wide variety of pollinators. If you have limited space, you can plant flowers in containers on a patio, balcony, and even window boxes.
  3. Eliminate pesticide use in your green spaces, or incorporate plants that attract beneficial insects for pest control.
  4. Accept some plant damage on plants meant to provide habitat for butterfly and moth larvae.
  5. Provide clean water for pollinators with a shallow dish, bowl, or birdbath with half-submerged stones for perches.
  6. Leave dead tree trunks, in your green spaces for wood-nesting bees and beetles.
  7. Support land conservation in your community by helping to create and maintain community gardens and green spaces to ensure that pollinators have appropriate habitat.

Thanks to Birmingham Open Spaces Forum for the lovely drawing they published in Facebook

LINKS:

https://bosf.org.uk

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The recent Place Alliance Housing Audit suggest that when built Langley SUE will be “Mediocre” or “Poor”

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Overview

With the drive to deliver more homes across the country has come a loud call for those developments to be of a high standard of design in order to deliver high quality, liveable and sustainable environments for residents. Research has consistently shown that high quality design makes new residential developments more acceptable to local communities and delivers huge value to all.

Housing design audits represent systematic approaches to assess the design quality of the external residential environment. This new audit by the Place Alliance evaluates the design of 142 large-scale housing-led development projects across England against seventeen design considerations. It provides enough data for comparisons to be made regionally and against the results of previous housing design audits conducted over a decade ago. It establishes a new baseline from which to measure progress on housing design quality in the future.

Whilst some limited progress has been made in some regions, overwhelmingly the message is that the design of new housing environments in England are ‘mediocre’ or ‘poor’. Collectively, we need to significantly raise our game if we are to create the sorts of places that future generations will feel proud to call home.

Findings and Recommendations

Based on a design audit of 142 housing developments across England, and correlations with data on market, contextual and design governance factors, a number of conclusions were drawn. These concern the type of housing that is being delivered, what is going right and wrong, and why there is such a variation in practice across the country.

Follow this LINK to find out more . . .

 

Research National Housing Audit